STORIES
December 4, 2017

Watch Now: Top 5 Things Every Nurse Needs In The Isolation Room

Watch Now: Top 5 Things Every Nurse Needs In The Isolation Room

By: Blake Lynch, "Nurse Blake"

I'm that annoying nurse who sometimes forgets essential supplies when entering an isolation room.

Ok, who am I kidding? I forget these items all the time.

Why do I suddenly have Adele's "Hello" stuck in my head? Oh, because "I must have called (my coworkers) a thousand times." Pretty sure they've started to pretend they don't hear me!

During my last shift I must have gowned-up over 100 times (or, at least it felt that way!) Seriously, most of my shifts are spent in isolation rooms - a lot of patients are on contact precautions nowadays.

Let's be real, I dread having to gown-up then undress and gown-up again just to grab a darn alcohol swap. Why do I ALWAYS forget those? Ugh. 

In 2018 I have set the resolution to be better prepared for the room of no return. Here's my checklist of items I commonly forget - don't be like me, just bring these items in the room with you: 

1. Stethoscope

I can't be the ONLY one who forgets the most essential nursing tool. Or, am I? In my opinion, disposable stethoscopes are the best. I just wonder why I never notice them in the isolation room until after I request one from my awesome coworker. OOPS!  

2. Flushes

I mean, always! Do I even have to explain?

3. NS Bag

It never fails that the time I don't bring in an NS bag, the infusion alarm will start beeping. Of course!

4. Wipes and Bed Sheet

CODE BROWN! CODE BROWN! Whenever this happens, there's usually only 1 scragly wipe left in the entire room when I need like 10 packs. 

5. Alcohol Swabs

This is like leaving disposable grocery bags at your house and realizing it when you're checking out at Whole Foods. ALWAYS!

Did I mention how much I love my awesome co-workers who come to the rescue every time? Love you, guys. You're the best!

Nurse Blake is a registered nurse and received his BSN from the University of Central Florida. He has worked in a number of healthcare roles throughout his career and has managed several injury prevention programs and started Banned4Life, which ended an outdated FDA blood donor policy. Today, Blake is an advocate for nurses and patients and encourages a healthy work environment. He is a writer, public speaker, and has been a paid contributor to the New York Times. Follow Nurse Blake on Instagram and Facebook

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